Oracle VM Server Installation

This guide describes how to plan for and install Oracle VM Server. This guide applies up to Oracle VM Release 3.1+, 3.2+, and 3.3+..


Oracle VM Server Installation Introduction

Oracle VM Server for x86 can be installed on Intel or AMD x86_64 hardware using a bootable CD-ROM or over the network using a pre-boot execution environment (PXE). Both Oracle VM Server installation methods, CD-ROM and PXE boot, require the Oracle VM Server Media Pack. The Oracle VM Server Media Pack is available at the Oracle Linux and Oracle VM Cloud Portal. Access to the Oracle Linux and Oracle VM Cloud Portal requires an Oracle SSO user account and password.
 


 

 

Oracle VM Server Pre-Deployment Checklist

Verify which version of Oracle VM is certified for the Oracle applications you plan to deploy on Oracle VM. Note: Visit My Oracle Support and click the Certifications link to search for the Oracle products you plan to deploy on Oracle VM.

 


Download the Oracle VM Media Pack

The Oracle VM Media Pack is available at the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud - Oracle Linux and Oracle VM portal. Access to the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud requires an Oracle.com user account and password. If you do not already have an Oracle.com user account, visit the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud, portal click the Sign In / Register link or button to create an Oracle.com account.
 


 

Oracle VM Server Installation Release 3.3.x

1. Insert the Oracle VM Server media into the CD-ROM drive.
2. Boot the server with the Oracle VM Server media in the CD-ROM drive.
3. The Oracle VM Server Welcome screen is displayed.

 


 

 

Oracle VM Server Installation Release 3.1 up to 3.2

1. Insert the Oracle VM Server media into the CD-ROM drive. 2. Boot the server with the Oracle VM Server media in the CD-ROM drive. 3. The Oracle VM Server Welcome screen is displayed.
 


 

 

Oracle VM Post Installation Checklist

After installing Oracle VM, review and complete all of the necessary tasks on the post-installation checklist before the Oracle VM Server is added to a pool. These tasks involve validating the Oracle VM Server's networking prerequisites and disabling CPU operating states (C-states) in the BIOS.


 

 

1. Oracle VM Name Resolution

Applicable to all Oracle VM 3.x Releases. The Oracle VM Server(s) must have consistent name resolution using DNS with both forward and reverse lookups. First, open the “/etc/resolv.conf” file by typing “vi /etc/resolv.conf” and confirm that the domain name or names, and two DNS servers are listed. The next example shows one domain name and two DNS servers listed in a resolv.conf file.
 


 

 

2. Oracle VM /etc/hosts File Requirements

Applicable to all Oracle VM 3.x Releases. The Oracle VM Server’s host name in the /etc/hosts file must be associated with the server's public IP address. If an Oracle VM Server host name is associated with 127.0.0.1, the cluster.conf file will be malformed and the cluster will not be operational.


 

3. Disable Extra C-states

Applicable to all Oracle VM 3.x Releases. To reduce the risk of unexpected server reboots, extra C-states should be disabled in the BIOS of each Oracle VM Server. If the BIOS has a settings named "Active Power Controller mode", disable this option as well.
 


 

 

4. Patch the Oracle VM Server(s)

Applicable to all Oracle VM 3.x Releases. Even after a fresh installation of the lastest Oracle VM Server release, a best practice is to patch the Oracle VM Server before setting up the server pool, and doing any testing to avoid previously fixed bugs.


 

 

5. Install the Oracle VM Server Support Tools

Applicable up to Oracle VM 3.2.8 Releases, NOT applicable for Oracle VM 3.3.x Release and above. The default behavior of the Oracle VM Server installation program is to allocate only 3GB of storage for the entire Oracle VM server installation, regardless of the amount of available disk space. Oracle VM Server 3.x was designed to be installed on small (3GB) flash storage modules.
 


 

 

6. Install Oracle OS Watcher

OS Watcher Black Box (oswbb) is a utility that uses native Linux commands and shell scripts to collect and archive metrics for diagnostics and performance troubleshooting. OS Watcher Black Box operates as a set of background processes that collect and archive data on a regular basis, using ps, top, mpstat, iostat, netstat, traceroute and vmstat.


 

7. Install the Mokum Oracle VM Diagnostic Utilities

Applicable to all Oracle VM 3.x Releases. The Mokum Oracle VM Server Diagnostic Utilities are a collection of diagnostic, and operations scripts for Oracle VM Server 3.x.. To install, simply unzip the mokum_oracle_vm_server_diagnostic_utilities-7-21-2014.zip file on your Oracle VM server in /root, chmod 755 -R mokum_oracle_vm_server_diagnostic_utilities7-21-2014, and run the scripts from the mokum_oracle_vm_server_diagnostic_utilities-7-21-2014 directory.
 


 

 

8. Install OVMProf

Oracle VM Profiler (OVMProf) is a system-wide profiler for Oracle VM Server Release 3 and above used to collect, display and compare system and cluster configurations. OVMProf is non-intrusive, it simply gathers information using native linux commands. OVMProf can output to one large text file and/or a menu driven web page.


 

9. Install NMON

nmon (short for Nigel's Monitor) is a free system monitor tool for the AIX and Linux operating systems, like Oracle VM. nmon concentrates on performance information for the performance tuner and in a concise layout to aim understanding. This includes: CPU, memory, disks, adapters, networks, NFS, Kernel statistics, File-systems, Workload Manger (AIX), Workload Partitions (AIX) and Top Processes.
 


 

 

10. Oracle VM NUMA Best Practices

Contemporary CPU’s from Intel and AMD have NUMA architectures. NUMA stands for Non-Uniform Memory Access. With NUMA each physical CPU (pCPU) will be assigned its own local memory. An assigned processor-memory pair is called a NUMA node. Local memory access from CPUs on the same socket will have significantly lower latency than remote memory access from CPUs on a different socket.


 

Uninstall / Remove Oracle VM

There is not an option to “uninstall” Oracle VM, although there are many ways to remove Oracle VM from a system. The method you select to remove Oracle VM from a system depends on your organizations security requirements.
 


 

Appendix

 

Oracle VM Installation on Dell PowerEdge R820 - Panic on CPU 0: queue invalidate wait descriptor was not executed. Reboot in five seconds

When installing Oracle VM Server 3.x on Dell PowerEdge R820 servers, after starting the installation, Xen panics with "Panic on CPU 0: queue invalidate wait descriptor was not executed. Reboot in five seconds", and the installation is stopped. This is a known issues with Xen, and can be resolved by adding custom boot commands.


 

Oracle VM Server Installation Hangs While Loading Xen.gz

The installation of Oracle VM Server 3.0.x hangs while loading xen.gz on servers with Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) cards or with console redirection enabled in the BIOS.
 


 

 

 

Oracle VM Oracle VM 3.3 Default Runlevel Settings for System Services

The next example shows the Oracle VM 3.3 default runlevel settings for system services.

 


 

Oracle VM Oracle VM 3.2 Default Runlevel Settings for System Services

The next example shows the Oracle VM 3.2 default runlevel settings for system services.
 


 

 

Oracle VM 3.3 install.log File

The next example shows a Oracle VM 3.3 install.log file.

 


 

Oracle VM 3.2 install.log File

The next example shows a Oracle VM 3.2 install.log file.
 


 

 

Oracle VM 3.3 install.log.syslog File

The next example shows an Oracle VM 3.2 install.log.syslog file.

 


 

Oracle VM 3.2 install.log.syslog File

The next example shows an Oracle VM 3.2 install.log.syslog file.
 


 

 

Oracle VM 3.3 anaconda-ks.cfg File

Oracle VM 3.3 anaconda-ks.cfg File.

 


 

Oracle VM 3.2 anaconda-ks.cfg File

The next example shows an Oracle VM 3.2 an anaconda-ks.cfg file.
 


 

 

Oracle VM 3.3 Default /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts Settings

Oracle VM 3.3 Default /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts Settings.