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Oracle Database Virtualization Guide

This chapter of the Oracle Cloud Cookbook describes how to virtualize production Oracle Databases using Oracle VM for x86 on commodity x86 hardware while lowering your total Oracle cost of ownership, and improving your Oracle operational efficiency.

Author: Roddy Rodstein

Table of Contents

 

Oracle Database Virtualization Introduction

Oracle database applications, ranging from e-commerce sites, financial, human resources management system (HRMS), supply chain management (SCM), customer resource management (CRM), to procurement systems, support business-critical functions. For many customers, these Oracle database applications have been in place for a very long time, preceding the virtualization era. Because of the history, and business-critical nature of Oracle database applications, many customers are still reluctant to virtualize these applications resulting in overprovisioned and underutilized servers, and overprovisioned Oracle licenses. Empirical data suggest that the reluctance to virtualize Oracle is a combination of the Oracle deployment history, misinformation, lack of Oracle virtualization experience, and fear of the unknown.
 
Advances in virtualization, hardware and storage technologies, along with Oracle licensing costs are driving Oracle customers to evaluate their virtualization options for Oracle database applications to lower their total Oracle cost of ownership, and to improve their Oracle operational efficiency. Oracle VM for x86 can result in significant business benefits such as a lower total Oracle cost of ownership, and improve Oracle operational efficiencies, with total control over Oracle licenses. Since the first release of Oracle VM, which was announced at Oracle Open World in November 2007, Oracle has provided certified support for Oracle databases, applications, and middleware solutions on Oracle VM, including both hard and soft partitioning for Oracle license management. 
 
Oracle VM is Oracle's flagship x86 server virtualization software that makes Oracle databases and applications easier to deploy, consolidate, manage, support, and license, on commodity x86 hardware, and with Oracle engineered systems. Oracle VM is managed via Oracle VM Manager, and Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control, or with OpenStack. Both Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control and OpenStack integration is bundled with Oracle VM support. Oracle VM is a FREE virtualization software with no licensing fees, that can be deployed on commodity x86 hardware, as well as bundled with Oracle's engineered solutions; Exalogic, Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance, and the Oracle Database Appliance. Oracle VM is the only x86 virtualization solution that Oracle tests, certifies and is fully supported by Oracle for Oracle technologies. Oracle does not test, certify, or support Oracle technology products on any Non-Oracle x86 virtualization solutions.
 
The Oracle VM is a type 1 hypervisor that installs directly on x86-64 hardware, enabling multiple concurrently running virtual machines to share a single piece of hardware. Each virtual machine has its own operating system, kernel, virtual CPUs, RAM, network interfaces, storage, and database or application. Oracle VM increases server utilization, and consolidation by breaking the traditional one-database-per-server approach to server provisioning while making operating systems and Oracle databases easier to deploy, manage, and support with seamless integration into the Oracle stack via Oracle Enterprise Manager.
 
The next images show the complete Oracle VM for x86 product line.
The Oracle VM Product Line
 
The next table lists each of the Oracle VM for x86 product offerings with a detailed description.
Oracle VM Product
Description
Oracle VM for x86 Software
  • Oracle VM is Oracle's flagship x86 server virtualization software that makes Oracle databases and applications easier to deploy, manage, support, and license, on commodity x86 hardware (Dell, Cisco, HP, etc).
  • Both Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control and OpenStack integration is bundled with Oracle VM support.
  • Oracle VM is “not” a licensed Oracle technology product. There are no license fees for Oracle VM for x86. Oracle offers enterprise support for Oracle VM on third-party hardware as well as bundled support with Sun hardware and Oracle Engineered Systems.
  • Suggested Retail Pricing for Oracle VM for x86 Support starts at US$599.00 per year for 2 CPU servers and US$1,990.00 per year for servers with over 2 CPUs.
  • Oracle VM is not a licensed Oracle product.
Exalogic
  • Exalogic is part of Oracle Engineered Systems portfolio and is intended for large-scale, performance-sensitive, mission-critical Oracle and Java application deployments.
  • Exalogic consist of a Sun Rack II 1242 base populated with Sun Server X4-2 Oracle VM compute nodes, an Oracle ZS3-ES storage appliance, a Cisco Catalyst 4948E-F-S switch, as well as InfiniBand and Ethernet networking components, running Oracle Linux virtual machines. The number of components in each Exalogic machine varies based on the hardware configuration; Full Rack, Half Rack, Quarter rack, and Eight Rack.
  • Exalogic Elastic Cloud X4-2 Full Rack with 30 Compute Nodes $1,035,000 *Excluding annual support fees
  • Exalogic Elastic Cloud X4-2 Half Rack with 16 Compute Nodes $600,000 *Excluding annual support fees
  • Exalogic Elastic Cloud X4-2 Quarter Rack with 8 Compute Nodes $370,000 *Excluding annual support fees
  • Exalogic Elastic Cloud X4-2 Eighth Rack with 4 Compute Nodes $250,000 *Excluding annual support fees
Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance
  • The Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance is part of Oracle Engineered Systems portfolio and is Oracle' converged Infrastructure offerings designed for green field virtualization.
  • An Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance consist of a Sun Rack II 1242 base populated with Sun Server X4-2 Linux Management nodes, and Oracle VM compute nodes, an Oracle ZS3-ES storage appliance with 18 TB serial-attached SCSI (SAS) disks, an Oracle Fabric Interconnect F1-15 Director Switch, NM2-36P Sun Datacenter InfiniBand Expansion Switch, and Oracle Switch ES1-24, running Linux, Windows or Solaris virtual machines.
  • The Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance ships with a base rack including the infrastructure components, two management nodes, and two compute nodes. One base rack supports up to 25 compute nodes. The initial configuration can be extended one compute node at a time.
  • Virtual Compute Appliance X4-2 Base Rack $282,000
  • Virtual Compute Appliance X4-2 Server/Compute Node $15,500
Oracle Database Appliance
  • The Oracle Database Appliance is part of Oracle Engineered Systems portfolio and is Oracle' entry level Engineered System designed for Oracle database virtualization.
  • An Oracle Database Appliance is a 4U rack-mountable
    system containing two Sun Server X4-2 Oracle VM servers, and one storage shelf with Twenty 2.5-inch 900 GB 10K rpm SAS-2 HDDs. The server count can not be extended,, although a storage expansion package is available.
  • Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 $60,000
  • Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 Storage Expansion $40,000
 
As shown above, Oracle VM is Oracle' flagship x86 server virtualization software for Oracle database and application workloads. Oracle VM is packaged as a FREE software solution that can be used with your x86 hardware, as well as prepackaged with Oracle engineered solutions.
 
Note: The Oracle VM product line includes Oracle VM for x86 and Oracle VM for SPARC, previously called Sun Logical Domains. This whitepaper reviews Oracle VM on commodity x86 infrastructure. 
 

The Facts: Oracle Database Virtualization

Our Oracle database virtualization projects have the following similarities:
1. The Oracle database applications have been in production on UNIX for a very long time, preceding the x86 virtualization era. The DBAs could not fathom consolidating and virtualizing Oracle databases on commodity x86 hardware. Post Oracle VM deployment, the virtualized Oracle databases run database queries and batch jobs significantly quicker compared to the previous UNIX platforms, with significantly higher database consolidation across fewer servers, using less hardware, and fewer Oracle licenses.
2. The cost of an impending Oracle hardware refresh triggers a platform and Oracle license review.  The price, performance and Oracle licensing impact on UNIX is compared to Linux, and Oracle VM on commodity x86 hardware. Oracle recognizes both hard and soft partitioning for Oracle license management with Oracle VM. Utilizing hard and soft partitioning with Oracle VM on commodity x86 hardware allows customers to reduce their hardware and Oracle licensing costs up to 80% compared to UNIX, Linux and VMware. With Oracle VM, customers  only license the CPU cores they need without having to overprovision hardware, and Oracle licenses.
3. Our customers have had enormous success with VMware virtualization, and would like to have the same virtualization success with Oracle. With VMware the only Oracle licensing option is soft partitioning, that means licensing all of the CPU cores within an ESX cluster for each Oracle technology product. Soft Partitioning Oracle on VMware is cost prohibitive. Oracle recognizes both hard and soft partitioning for Oracle license management with Oracle VM. Hard partitioning allows us to license a subset of an Oracle VM Servers CPUs to Oracle databases and applications. Customers can reduce their hardware and Oracle licensing costs over 80% when compared to VMware without  overprovisioning hardware, and Oracle licenses.
 

Oracle Licensing Matters

Most Oracle customers license their Oracle technology products, including database and applications, by physical processor, and/or by named user. With physical servers, i.e. UNIX, Linux, and VMware, Oracle processor and named user licensing is static, with each Oracle product bound to a physical server, or cluster of servers licensed by the number of the server's processors. Conversely, with Oracle VM, Oracle processor licensing is dynamic, with each Oracle product allocated to a subset of an Oracle VM Server's CPU cores, this is referred to as hard partitioning, and/or bound to a single Oracle VM Server, or a subset of Oracle VM Servers within a cluster, this is referred to as soft partitioning. Unlike hard partitioning that allows us to license a subset of an Oracle VM Server's CPU cores to Oracle products, soft partitioning requires all of a Server's (UNIX, Linux, VMware and Oracle VM) CPU cores to be licensed for each Oracle product. Soft partitioning with a cluster, for example a VMware cluster, would require a license for all of the CPU cores within the VMware cluster. Utilizing hard and soft partitioning with Oracle VM allows customers to only license the CPU cores they need without having to overprovision hardware, and Oracle licenses.
 
With Oracle VM, hard partitioning allows us to pin a virtual machine's CPUs to a subset of an Oracle VM Server’s CPU cores, and only pay Oracle for the pinned CPUs. For example, with Oracle VM hard partitioning, an enterprise edition Oracle database could run on a virtual machine that is pinned to an Oracle VM Server with 4 CPUs (four sockets) each with 24 cores (96 cores), and you only pay Oracle for the pinned CPUs, i.e. you can pin the virtual machine's CPUs to the exact number of CPUs you need. The same virtual machine running on a VMware server with 4 CPUs (four sockets) each with 24 cores (96 cores) with an enterprise edition Oracle database would require 48 Oracle processor licenses. With any Non-Oracle x86 virtualization solutions, the only Oracle licensing option is soft partitioning. With hard partitioning you only pay Oracle for the CPUs you actually need.
 
Soft partitioning requires all of the physical server's CPU cores to be licensed. With a cluster, each server where an Oracle technology can run must have its CPU cores licensed. The number one use case with soft partitioning is the ability to license a subset of servers within a cluster, essentially consolidating the Oracle workloads to subset of servers and CPU cores with a cluster. For example, with soft partitioning, an enterprise edition Oracle database could run on virtual machines that are restricted to a subset of servers within a cluster, for example 2 Oracle VM Servers from a 32 node cluster, essentially reducing the processor count and licensing costs from 32 servers to 2 servers. Customers elect to use soft partitioning over hard partitioning to take advantage of Oracle VM's Live Migration, Distributed Resource Scheduler (DRS) and Distributed Power Management (DPM) features that are only supported with soft partitioning.
 
Intel/AMD CPUs have Hyperthreading technology that makes one CPU core look like two. From an Oracle processor licensing perspective, Hyper-threading does not increase the Oracle processor license count. Enabling Hyper-threading will increase the overall processor capacity of an Oracle VM Server, and an Oracle VM Server pool. For example, with hyper-threading disabled, a CPU is running a single thread per core. With hyper-threading enabled, the number of threads within a core double, and virtual machines can use the additional threads without incurring additional Oracle processor licensing penalties. With hyper-threading enabled, a virtual machine with 4 CPUs is actually is accessing 2 CPU cores, 4 CPU threads, or 1 Oracle CPU license. With hyper-threading disabled, the same virtual machine with 4 CPUs is actually consuming 4 CPU cores, or 2 Oracle CPU license. Oracle recognizes each CPU core as a separate CPU and each CPU type with a different processor factor. The processor factor determines the processor count. The processor count determines the number of processors required to license the Oracle product. 
 
Understanding Oracle licensing using hard and soft partitioning with Oracle VM can help your organization manage Oracle licensing costs. Our customers are able to reduce their hardware and Oracle licensing costs up to 80% compared to Oracle on UNIX, Linux and VMware, with better performance, and lower total cost of ownership. 
 

Hardware Sizing Matters

The server hardware and storage infrastructure for your Oracle VM environment is a critical component in the success of your Oracle database virtualization project. Properly sized server hardware, and storage infrastructure will pave the way to a successful project. Plan your hardware configuration in advance of deploying Oracle VM. Here are some guidelines: 
 
The majority of our customers order their standard x86 server hardware for Oracle VM, and connect the hardware to their existing storage infrastructure. The standard hardware typically has 2 multi-core CPUs, up to 256 GB of RAM, 2 RAID 1 disks, 4 10G NICs, and 2 1-Port 8Gb HBAs. There are pros and cons to using your standard x86 server hardware and existing storage for Oracle VM. The pros are that your standard x86 server hardware is simple to procure and deploy, and your existing storage infrastructure is in-place and ready to go. The cons are that production Oracle database workloads may need more resources than your standard x86 server hardware and existing storage can deliver. 
 
A smaller number of customers size and order server hardware and storage infrastructure for their Oracle VM environments. These folks typically order servers with 4 multi core CPUs, up to 4TB of RAM, 2 RAID 1 disks, 6 to 8 10G NICs, and 2 2-Port 8Gb HBAs, with dedicated EMC storage. There are pros and cons to using non standard x86 hardware and dedicated storage for Oracle VM. The pros are that your production Oracle database workloads will have all of the resources they need. The cons are that a new x86 standards hardware platform will need to be introduced, with dedicated storage, at a higher cost.
 

Oracle VM Server Hardware Sizing Tips and Tricks

The first step in selecting an Oracle VM hardware platform is to size the server hardware, followed by calculating the total number of servers required to be in each Oracle VM server pool. The formula to calculate Oracle VM server sizing is: The total aggregate of the virtual machine CPU, RAM and storage requirements plus your N+x availability requirements provides the total server count along with the hardware requirements.
 
Oracle VM server sizing is calculated by adding the aggregate CPU, RAM and shared storage requirements for all of the virtual machines that could run on any single Oracle VM server, and then size and select server hardware with ample CPU, RAM and I/O resources. Once the server hardware has been selected, the number of servers in a server pool is calculated by selecting enough servers to support the aggregate CPU, RAM and storage requirements of all of the virtual machines within a server pool, including the additional Oracle VM servers for high availability. Oracle VM server pools that use High Availability (HA), Live Migration and Distributed Resource Scheduling (DRS) must have excess CPU and RAM capacity for hardware failures and virtual machine migrations. 
 
The exact number of network interfaces for an Oracle VM Server entirely depends on your organization’s server hardware platform, and network and storage infrastructure capabilities. For example, an Oracle VM Server with four or more 10G NICs, configured with two 802.1Q bonds could support the most demanding Database requirements.
 
The next table shows the maximum number of CPUs, RAM and NICs for Oracle VM server release 3.2.x, and 3.3.x.
Item
3.2.x Maximum
3.3.x Maximum
CPU Cores or Threads
160
900
RAM
4 TB
6 TB
NICs
40
No limit
 
Before starting Oracle database virtualization project, we profile the existing Oracle systems to be able to size the Oracle VM hardware, storage and network infrastructure. 
 
The next example shows our system profile format with example data from an E-Business Suite environment on physical Linux systems. The below example shows each Oracle product installed on a dedicated HP DL 380.
 
Name
OS
Hardware
CPUs/Cores
Processor Factor
RAM
Total Storage
Peek IOPS
Average IOPS
dbprod
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
4 CPUs
16 Cores
8 Licenses
128 GB
1.5 TB
10493
2102
dbtest
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
4 CPUs
16 Cores
8 Licenses
128 GB
1.5 TB
14493
3802
obiprod
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
2 CPUs
8 Cores
4 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
1534
91
obitest
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
2 CPUs
8 Cores
4 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
2834
152
soaprod
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
2 CPUs
8 Cores
4 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
2491
68
soatest
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
2 CPUs
8 Cores
4 Licenses
32 GB
170 GB
2903
92
approd
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
2 CPUs
8 Cores
4 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
673
22
aptest
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
2 CPUs
8 Cores
4 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
1200
35

 

Total Servers
Total Oracle Licenses
8
40
 
The below example shows the virtualized foot print from the above environment now on Oracle VM with hyperthreading enabled. Oracle VM reduced the server count by 62.5%, and reduced the Oracle license count by 65%.
 
Name
OS
Hardware
*CPUs/Cores
Processor Factor
RAM
Total Storage
Peek IOPS
Average IOPS
dbprod
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
16 CPUs
4 Licenses
128 GB
1.5 TB
10493
2102
dbtest
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
16 CPUs
4 Licenses
128 GB
1.5 TB
14493
3802
obiprod
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
4 CPUs
1 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
1534
91
obitest
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
4 CPUs
1 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
2834
152
soaprod
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
4 CPUs
1 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
2491
68
soatest
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
4 CPUs
1 Licenses
32 GB
170 GB
2903
92
approd
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
4 CPUs
1 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
673
22
aptest
Oracle Linux 5
DL 380
4 CPUs
1 Licenses
32 GB
300 GB
1200
35

 

Total Servers
Total Oracle Licenses
3
14


*Note: With hyper-threading enabled, a virtual machine with 4 CPUs is actually accessing 2 CPU cores, 4 CPU threads, or 1 Oracle CPU license. With hyper-threading disabled, the same virtual machine with 4 CPUs is actually consuming 4 CPU cores, or 2 Oracle CPU license. Oracle recognizes each CPU core as a separate CPU and each CPU type with a different processor factor. The processor factor determines the processor count. The processor count determines the number of processors required to license the Oracle product. 

 

Oracle VM Server Storage Sizing Tips and Tricks

The storage infrastructure for your Oracle VM environment is a critical component in the success of your Oracle database virtualization project. Properly sized storage infrastructure will pave the way to a successful project. Plan your storage configuration in advance of deploying Oracle VM. Here are some details and guidelines: 
 
An Oracle VM storage solution consists of three distinct layers. Each layer has its own unique requirements, configurations, dependencies and features. 
  1. The first layer is the storage array, which is referred to as back-end storage. Oracle VM supports Fibre Channel and iSCSI SAN, and NFS back-end storage.
  2. The second layer is the Oracle VM Server's Device-Mapper Multipath, or Powerpath configurations, and the shared OCFS2 or NFS file systems.
  3. The third layer is the guest front-end storage consisting of file (virtual disk) and RAW (LUNs) disks. RAW disks have the best performance of the two front-end storage options. RAW disks are the best option for high I/O workloads like Oracle Databases.
 
The next image shows the Oracle VM storage architecture.
Oracle VM Storage Architecture
 
Each Oracle VM server pool uses one dedicated OCFS2 12G LUN, or NFS share for the server pool's cluster configurations, and one or more OCFS2 or NFS storage repositories for the virtual machine configuration files, images, and templates. RAW disks (LUNs) will be provisioned for the high I/O disks such as Oracle database files.
 
  • While it is tempting to create a very large single LUN for your storage repository, this can be lead to LUN contention, and poor performance, as each virtual machine queues I/Os to the same disks. Oracle recommend to provision storage repositories no larger than 2TB. We recommend placing no more than 10 virtual machines per storage repository. 
  • Confirm that throughput and latency needs of the databases can be meet with the storage array, NICs, or HBA ports. 
  • Plan for excess I/O capacity for meeting peak loads. 
  • Plan the size and type of storage by workload. For example: 
    • Operating systems and SWAP disks should live on the storage repositories. Limit 10 virtual machines per storage repository to avoid LUN contention.
    • High I/O disks such as Oracle database files should be placed on RAW disks.
  • Example Linux Database I/O DESIGN:
    • The Operating systems' / file systems is a virtual disk on an ocfs2 repository
    • The SWAP disk is a virtual disk on an ocfs2 repository
    • /u01 is a NFS mount point or separate virtual disk on an ocfs2 repository
    • redo01 is a dedicated RAW disk (LUN)
    • redo02 is a dedicated RAW disk (LUN)
    • archive01 is a dedicated RAW disk (LUN)
    • archive02 is a dedicated RAW disk (LUN)
    • dbdisk01 is a dedicated RAW disk (LUN)
    • dbdisk02 is a dedicated RAW disk (LUN)
 
Note: Consult with your DBAs to document which mount points should be placed on RAW disks.
 

Virtual Machine Sizing Tips and Tricks

There are several rules of thumb for sizing Linux database virtual machines. Here are some details and guidelines: 
 
  • Oracle VM supported CPU over-allocation. A best practice is to avoid oversubscribing CPU-bound workloads such as the Oracle Database. CPU oversubscription with CPU-bound workloads negatively affects the performance and availability of an Oracle VM server along with all of the virtual machines running on the server. CPU oversubscription for non-CPU-bound workloads, such as Oracle Fusion Middleware products, is highly recommended. It is common to oversubscribe CPU cores 3-to-1 with non-CPU-bound workloads. For example, one CPU core could be allocated to 3 virtual CPUs for non-CPU-bound workloads without a performance penalty.
  • Oracle VM does not support RAM over-allocation. By default, each Oracle VM server reserves ~512MB of memory just for Oracle VM server (the hypervisor). The average memory overhead for each running virtual machine on an Oracle VM server is approximately 20MB plus 1% of the guest’s memory size. The remaining physical memory can be allocated to virtual machines. The memory requirement for a virtual machine depends on the virtual machine's workload requirements, but will not vary from the memory required for the same workload running on bare metal. 
  • It is important to get the highest density for your data-center, but at some point resources saturation occurs. With Oracle database workloads network or Fiber I/O is typically the first resources where saturation occurs. Confirm that throughput and latency needs of the databases can be meet with the storage array, NICs, or HBA ports.  
 
The average virtual machine size for databases range from 4 CPUs with 24 GB of RAM up to 16 CPUs with 128 GB of RAM. With Oracle VM Release 3.2, we see diminished returns with virtual machines with more than 16 CPUs with 128 GB of RAM. Application servers range from 2 CPUs with 8 GB of RAM up to 4 CPUs with 128 GB of RAM.
 

Design Matters

As with any IT project, a successful Oracle database virtualization project starts with a design and project plan. We have developed a format that allows us to gather project information, and deliver a comprehensive design and project plan. The next example shows our design and planning format: 
I) Oracle Database Virtualization Project Plan 
II) Oracle Product Certification 
III) Oracle VM Server Hardware, Storage and Network Infrastructure Sizing 
IV) Oracle VM Server Hardware BIOS, Firmware, NIC and HBA Requirements & Settings 
V) Oracle VM Storage Requirements & Settings 
VI) Oracle VM Server Networking Requirements & Settings 
VII) Oracle VM Server Pool Networking Requirements & Settings 
VIII) Oracle Enterprise Manager Requirements & Settings 
IX) Logical Architecture 
X) Oracle VM Installation Requirements & Settings 
XI) Virtual Machine Definitions, Installation Requirements & Settings
XII) Oracle Database Definitions, Installation Requirements & Settings 
XIII) Oracle VM Backup & Recovery Design & Requirements 
XIV) Oracle VM Fault Testing
XV) Oracle VM & Virtual Machine I/O & Network Benchmarking 
XVI) Disaster Recovery Planning
XVIIII) Oracle VM Recovery Overview, Installation and Configuration 
XIX) Disaster Recovery & Business Interruption Testing & Event Process Flow 
XX) Go-live
 
It is hard to succeed without a plan. Plan your Oracle database virtualization project in advance before deploying Oracle VM.
 

Conclusion

Many Oracle customers are still running Oracle production databases on underutilized physical servers with overprovisioned Oracle licenses. The reluctance to virtualize Oracle is a combination of the Oracle deployment history, misinformation, lack of Oracle virtualization experience, and fear of the unknown.
 
Oracle VM is Oracle' flagship x86 server virtualization software that was designed from the ground up for Oracle database and application workloads. Oracle VM is packaged as a FREE software solution that can be used with your x86 hardware, as well as prepackaged with Oracle engineered solutions.
 
Oracle VM on commodity x86 hardware allows our customers to reduce their hardware and Oracle licensing costs up to 80% compared to UNIX, Linux and VMware. With Oracle VM, our customers only license the CPU cores they need without having to overprovision hardware, and Oracle licenses. 
 
Following the best practices in this white paper your virtualized Oracle databases could be running database queries and batch jobs significantly quicker compared to your existing platform, with significantly higher database consolidation across fewer servers, using less hardware, and fewer Oracle licenses.
 
Document Created: 09/09/2014
Last Update: 09/09/2014
 
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