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Oracle VM Server Installation Introduction

Oracle VM Server Installation Introduction

Oracle VM Server for x86 can be installed on Intel or AMD x86_64 hardware using a bootable CD-ROM or over the network using a pre-boot execution environment (PXE). Both Oracle VM Server installation methods, CD-ROM and PXE boot, require the Oracle VM Server Media Pack. The Oracle VM Server Media Pack is available at the Oracle Linux and Oracle VM Cloud Portal. Access to the Oracle Linux and Oracle VM Cloud Portal requires an Oracle SSO user account and password. The Oracle VM Server Media Pack is downloaded as zip and/or ISO files. The Oracle VM Server ISO image can be burned to a bootable CD and used for a CD-ROM installation as well as staged on a boot server for a PXE boot installation. Oracle VM is distributed as Open Source software, therefore the source code is also available along with the ISO image at the Oracle Linux and Oracle VM Cloud Portal. The Oracle VM Server source code is not needed to install Oracle VM server. 
 
Oracle VM Server can be installed from a CD-ROM, or over the network (PXE) with the installation media hosted via NFS, FTP, or HTTP. The difference between installing Oracle VM Server from a CD-ROM, or over the network is how the server boots and the location of the installation media. Contemporary servers can boot from a bootable CD in a local CD-ROM drive, from a remote CD-ROM drive using a Lights out Management (LOM) solution as well as over the network using a pre-boot execution environment (PXE). Once the server boots, the installation program can install Oracle VM Server from the CD-ROM, or over the network via NFS, FTP or HTTP.
 
Tip: Occasionally CD-ROM installations using Lights out Management (LOM) solutions terminate with file copy errors. If you encounter file copy errors with a Lights out Management (LOM) installation, the workaround is to stage the Oracle VM Server media files on the server’s hard disk, or on a NFS share, FTP server or a HTTP server on the same network as the target server. Once the Oracle VM Server media files have been staged on the server’s hard disk, a NFS share, FTP server or a HTTP server, boot the server with the bootable CD and when presented with the Install Method screen, enter the path to the installation media.
 
Oracle recommends a dual core CPU or multiple CPUs with at least 1GB or 2GB of RAM. Oracle’s minimum CPU and RAM recommendation for Oracle VM Server is a starting point for a proof of concept (POC) running only a couple virtual machines.
 
A minimum of one Ethernet network interface (NIC) card is required to install Oracle VM, although at least four or more 10G NICs is strongly recommended. NIC bonding with port-based VLANs and/or 802.1Q tag-based VLANs are supported and configured post Oracle VM Server installation with Oracle VM Manager or Enterprise Manager. Oracle VM 3.0.1 through 3.1.1 supports two NIC ports per network bond, and a total of five network bonds per Oracle VM Server. Oracle VM 3.2.x supports four NIC ports per network bond, and a total of ten network bonds per Oracle VM Server. Oracle VM 3.3.x supports two hundred and fifty six [256] NIC ports per network bond, with no limit on the number of network bonds per Oracle VM Server.
 
The exact number of network interfaces for an Oracle VM Server entirely depends on your organization’s business requirements, server hardware, and network and storage infrastructure capabilities. For example, an Oracle VM Server with four 10G NICs, configured with two 802.1Q bonds could support the most demanding network and storage requirements, with only four NICs. By contrast, an Oracle VM Server using access ports/port-based VLANs or 802.1Q tag-based VLANS on a 1G copper network, could easily use over 10 NIC/ports to meet your minimum network requirements.
 
The Oracle VM 3.0 installation program allows the server' IP address to be assigned using DHCP or as a static IP address. It is recommended to use a static IP address for Oracle VM Servers to ensure that each server always receives the same IP address. Using DHCP assigned IP addresses can result in unexpected IP address changes due to DHCP lease expiry setting causing unexpected results.
 
The default behavior of the Oracle VM Server 3.1 and 3.2 installation program is to allocate only 3GB of storage for the entire installation, regardless of the amount of available disk space. With Oracle VM Server 3.1 and 3.2 I recommend re-allocating the free space to the root “/” partition for log files and diagnostics. Server Oracle VM Server 3.1 and 3.2 only requires 3 GB of storage, you might consider procuring disk-less hardware with a flash storage module or boot from SAN to reduce operating costs.
 
Tip: When installing Oracle VM Server 3.1 and 3.2 on a small flash storage module, i.e. 4GB, it is necessary to select the "Create a minimal partition layout for installation to a USB drive" partition layout option.
 
The default behavior of the Oracle VM Server 3.3.x installation program is to create partitions with the maximum amount of disk space for dom0, then use the rest for an OCSF2 local repository for virtual machines, templates, or SWAP disks. The only way to change the default partitioning layout is to install Oracle VM Server using a kickstart file.
 
The following table shows the Oracle VM Server installation roadmap:
Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Step 4
Oracle VM Server Pre-Deployment Checklist
Download the Oracle VM Media Pack
Oracle VM Server Installation
Oracle VM Post Installation Checklist
 

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